Thomas Sutcliffe

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Full name: Thomas Sutcliffe

Area of interest: Arts, Culture, Current Affairs

Journals/Organisation: The Independent

Email: t.sutcliffe@independent.co.uk

Personal website:

Website: http://www.independent.co.uk/biography/tom-sutcliffe

Blog:

Representation:

Networks:

Biography:

About:

Education: Emmanuel College, Cambridge: English

Career: After graduation joined BBC as a researcher, going on to become the editor of Radio 4’s Kaleidoscope arts programme; left the BBC to help launch The Independent, as its first arts editor (1986)

  • Resumed a career as broadcaster presenting Radio 4’s Saturday Review arts discussion programme from its launch (1999), has also presented BBC2’s Newsnight Review, is the chair of Round Britain Quiz, and on BBC2 presented the six-part Watching series, based on his own collection of essays

Current position/role: Columist, television reviewer; also writes occasional obituaries

  • also writes/has written for: The Guardian

Other roles/Main role: Broadcaster, presenter

Other activities:

Disclosures:

Viewpoints/Insight:

Broadcast media:

  • BBC Radio 4 presenter of Saturday Review and Round Britain Quiz

Video:

Controversy/Criticism:

Awards/Honours:

Scoops:

Other:

Books & Debate:

Latest work:

Speaking/Appearances:

Debate:

Journals:

  • No regular column

Articles:

The Independent:

Column name: A Critical View

Remit/Info: Arts and Culture

Section:

Role: Columnist

Pen-name:

Email: t.sutcliffe@independent.co.uk

Website: Independent.co / Thomas Sutcliffe

Commissioning editor:

Day published: Saturday

Regularity: Weekly

Column format:

Average length:

Articles: 2013

Articles: 2012

Articles: 2011

Articles: 2010

  • Coldcocked by received opinion - There is sometimes a comedy to the cultural life whichis not entirely dignified. What I mean by that is that you can suddenly find that your expectations about a work, and your complacent assumptions about the part you will play in the drama of your encounter with it, are overturned by what actually happens - 31st December
  • The Year in Review: How the map of our culture was redrawn - How do you best map the cultural year? The conventional way is a kind of aesthetic Mercator projection, in which the irregular realities of the arts are smoothed out on to a single flat plane - 24th December
  • Suicide bombers and a novel twist - I'd like to propose an axiom. You cannot be both a good novelist and a good suicide bomber - 17th December
  • A critic who sees the whole picture - At the beginning of this year, Tom Lubbock reviewed the Richard Hamilton retrospective at the Serpentine Gallery in London. Like all of the fine art criticism he wrote for this paper it was a notably thoughtful piece - 10th December
  • Dramatic pause that says so much - 3rd December 2010
  • The originals are still the best - We live in a culture where lack of originality is one of the cardinal sins, though not all cultures (historically or geographically) share that disapproval - 26th November
  • When words lose their power - I'm going to make a pledge of abstention today and, as it happens, you're going to be able to help keep me honest, because my self-imposed prohibition doesn't involve alcohol but vocabulary - 19th November
  • Ancient discovery raises the spirits - Discrepancy of belief is, I imagine, a fairly familiar experience for a lot of us when it comes to big exhibitions of classical or ancient art - 12th November
  • It's time to queue for conceptual art - I don't know whether you saw the story the other day about a mysterious surge of visitors for a small exhibition at the National Gallery but, if you missed it, it was essentially a tale of popular insurgency - 5th November
  • Sentimentality. An artistic crime? - The other day I saw two different works that had decided to end with the same emotional flourish - 29th October
  • Strawberry Hill forever - I wouldn't usually suggest to you that you visit a museum that is still a bit of a shambles but I intend to this week - 22nd October
  • Tales of mystery and imagination - One of the more engaging objects in Tate Modern's current Gauguin exhibition isn't a painting at all, but a house-front; four carved panels which Gauguin created to decorate his home in the Marquesas - 8th October
  • Don't put your novel on the stage - You would think that Trevor Nunn might have learned his lesson after Gone With the Wind - 1st October
  • Who do you think you're looking at? - It's always surprising to find how long a history the newfangled has - 24th September
  • Are we still backing the wrong horse? - There's a venerable story about the painter Constable which is often cited by writers who want us to recognise that he was a modern pioneer, rather than an exemplar of chocolate-box traditionalism - 17th September
  • Naked truths in a slippery read - When you turn page 225 of Will Self's new book, Walking to Hollywood, you get a modest surprise – or perhaps that should be an immodest one - 10th September
  • Real estate speak is the height of irony - The New York skyline is a sculpture created by the friction between civic regulation and the capitalist love of profit - 27th August
  • Sometimes the joy is in the label - It's a rare pleasure and a small one at that – but there's something about a provocative museum label that can really lift the spirits - 20th August
  • Installations are not built to last - I found myself thinking about posterity the other day, while watching a carousel of china dogs self-destruct - 30th July
  • Opening lines that can be a giveaway - Can you judge a book by its epigraph? That you do is surely true, since at the point when you turn that particular page of a new novel it's pretty much all you've got to go on - 23rd July
  • Water, water, everywhere at the Royal Academy's Sargent and the Sea exhibition - The Royal Academy's Sargent and the Sea exhibition has to be one of the nerdiest shows I've attended for years. I don't mean this to be a critical remark – or at least not entirely - 16th July
  • Throw the book at clichéd blurbs - People have been having fun at the expense of a novelist called Nicole Krauss, who recently supplied a jacket blurb for the proof copy of David Grossman's latest novel and – by some distance – overshot the target all collegiate blurb writers must aim for - 9th July
  • A costume drama drowns in strings - In 1995 the Danish directors Lars von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg drew up what they described as a Vow of Chastity, a list of ten cinematic commandments which were intended to purify film-making and focus all the energies of the film-maker on story and performance - 2nd July
  • Games find high art in low places - Why is it that our imaginations are policed so much more vigilantly when engaged in video games than with any other form of fiction? - 25th June
  • There's no gold in the Games, Danny - The week in culture - 11th June
  • What a Carrie on: will we ever agree? - Another week, another cinematic misogyny row - 4th June
  • Characters in search of the title - Anyone who's ever done a jigsaw or a crossword will know that there's an odd psychological moment when you finally work out a difficult clue or place the last piece - 28th May
  • How to craft art from decoration - I found myself wondering about the status of the decorative the other day - 21st May
  • Private lives in a public muddle - The creator of Glee, Ryan Murphy (hallowed be his name), has apparently called for a boycott of Newsweek magazine over a recent column by one of its writers - 14th May
  • There's merit in pretension - An interesting moment occurred during my tour of Artangel's latest project, a few days ago - 7th May
  • Renaissance artists had the hang of it - If you like drapery you're going to have a ball at the British Museum's new exhibition of Italian Renaissance Drawings - 30th April
  • Let's hear it for the theme tune - the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences are contemplating dropping the Emmy Award for the Best TV Theme Tune - 23rd April
  • An artist's dream home - 9th April
  • It’s a cop out to attack critics - 2nd April
  • The pious politics of the quilt - 26th March
  • Happiness – who needs it? - 'There's a lot of grimness out there," said the TV producer Daisy Goodwin earlier this week, complaining about the literary miserablism she'd encountered as the chair of this year's Orange Prize for Fiction jury - 19th March
  • The bitter ending - In what circumstances is it acceptable for a work of art to cheat us? - 12th March
  • Terror rides to remember - Like a fairground ghost ride a horror movie or a filmed ghost story can control to a large degree what you look at and when - 5th March
  • I miss the shock of the new - It's traditional to adopt a knowingly superior attitude to the first English reviewers of Ibsen's Ghosts – The Daily Telegraph's apoplectic response having a place of honour when it comes to furious fulmination - 26th February
  • The colour of muddy - The idea of a painter's "palette" – meaning the chromatic range that you associate with a particular artist – has always struck me as one of those slightly hazardous bits of aesthetic vocabulary - 19th February
  • Don't get cute with me - You enter a gallery and are confronted by the startling sight of a three-year-old boy apparently balancing a life-size polar bear on his nose - 12th February
  • The mother of all villains - Mo'Nique is, apparently, a "lock" for the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. Having seen her performance in Precious I'm not inclined to disagree - 5th February
  • Are you talking to me? - It's slightly odd, when you think about it, that we expect to be ignored in the theatre. We're the reason the damn thing is happening, after all - 29th January
  • A good play has no sell-by date - Watching the current revival of John Guare's Six Degrees of Separation the other night I found myself thinking about the durability of plays - 22nd January
  • She's almost famous - I've been encountering a lot of famous fictional people recently - 15th January
  • The cold comforts of snow - I can't imagine what can have prompted it but I found myself thinking about paintings of snow the other day - 8th January
  • Turn over a new leaf - Unusually, I already know what I'm going to be doing with my spare time this year – all of it, not to mention alarming stretches of time that couldn't reasonably be described as spare at all - 1st January

Articles: 2009

  • Why art exceeds evolution - The evolutionary theory of art and literature continues to simmer nicely, the latest bubble to reach the lip of the pan being Brian Boyd's book On the Origin of Stories: Evolution, Cognition and Fiction - 18th December
  • That irritating fade to black - To listen to some people talk, you'd think that people never got irritated with art - 4th December
  • The joy of a short story - In The Devil’s Dictionary Ambrose Bierce defined the novel as “a short story padded”. It’s a little self-serving as a definition this - 27th November
  • It's about as good as it gets - Goodness, notoriously, writes white – that is, it won't show up on the page. Evil, no problem at all – the ink flowing black and creating a contrast so sharp that you could read it from across the room - 20th November
  • The very model of a modern museum - I don't quite know how I'd managed to avoid the Ashmolean Museum all my life, but until just the other day I had - 13th November
  • It's good to be strung along - There was a brief theatrical vogue, some years ago now, for travelling toys - 6th November
  • It's time for tough love at the Tate - I tend to think of Bullets Over Broadway when I hear about collaborative artworks, Woody Allen's 1994 comedy being a near-perfect parable of the ruthlessness necessary for high artistic achievement - 23rd October
  • When a film is not a film - When the Cannes organisers invited Disney/ Pixar to present Up as the opening film of the 2009 festival they made history - 16th October
  • Art with the Midas touch - Did you know?" boasts ENO in a bulletin about Turandot, "English National Opera bought all the gold silk of its type available in the UK... for use on the set" - 9th October
  • The smiley face of extinction - Walking round the British Museum's Moctezuma exhibition the other day I found myself thinking about the Mitchell and Webb sketch about the anxious Nazi - 2nd October
  • How to bring death to life - You wait for years for a good corpse-sniffing description to come along and then two arrive at once - 25th September
  • The art of the recession - What will unemployment do for art? In the case of the Lehman employees, reported on in this paper earlier this week, the answer was relatively straightforward - 18th September
  • The word on the street art - There's a proposal coming up before Bristol City Council shortly that local citizens should be allowed to vote on whether graffiti – or street art – should be power-hosed or preserved - 11th September
  • Must we vote for poets? - Bad luck. If you haven't already voted in the BBC's Nation's Favourite Poet poll you're now disenfranchised - 4th September
  • Keen, lean times for the arts - the chairman of the British Museum, Niall FitzGerald, was reported as saying that it would be a "catastrophe" if the museum's plans for an extension, which depended on a big IOU from the government, had to be cancelled - 31st July
  • Don't confuse DIY with art - I've been struck by sheer craftsmanship a couple of times recently in an exhibition – a quality that we don't expect to see in an art gallery any more, at least not in the sense that it might be the raison d'être for going in the first place - 24th July
  • Whither thou goest, I will go - The joint death of Sir Edward and Lady Downes was described in a variety of ways in the press coverage of their decision to end their lives together - 17th July
  • An open space to remember - We wanted it to be user-friendly if you like, said one of those bereaved by the 7/7 bombings, giving an interview to the BBC about the permanent memorial to the dead, which was unveiled in Hyde Park this week - 10th July
  • The ironic demise of satire - Thirty-eight years ago, give or take a couple of months, Peter Cook and Nicholas Luard opened The Establishment Club in Greek Street, London; a nightclub which has a reasonable claim to be the most influential after-hours dive of the last century - 3rd July
  • Get up, stand up for your art - The Week In Culture - 19th June
  • Tom Sutcliffe: Baseball: a view from the boundary - It might sound a bit perverse to describe Sugar as a Test match film, but bear with me and I'll try and explain - 12th June
  • The captured imagination - I don't know whether you've helped contribute to J D Salinger's legal fund, but I know I have - 5th June
  • Whose work is it anyway? - I do enjoy a good attribution row, and the one currently smouldering in Italy over the authorship of a wooden sculpture of Christ is a connoisseur's item - 29th May
  • Why less involved is more - Is there any theatrical form in which the gap between theory and practice is as great as that in the promenade performance? - 22nd May
  • Sympathy for the silly old devil - Prince Charles has been talking about architecture again – and I think it would be unseemly to splutter, however strong the temptation is - 15th May
  • Tom Sutcliffe: To hell with art, look at that brawl - the story that two German academics had advanced the theory that Van Gogh never actually cut off his own ear had no trouble finding page space earlier this week - 8th May
  • The matter of facts in fiction - To the countless dualities with which we attempt to shape the chaos of the world into a more manageable form I would like to add another. You can divide readers into people who love the whaling bits in Moby Dick and people who find them a tedious ordeal - 1st May
  • The parking lot in modern mythology - I've occasionally fantasised about compiling a book called 95 Theses - 24th April
  • Appealing method in their madness - I found myself wondering the other day why portraits are so blandly noncommittal. The fact that they are, I realised, was the explanation for the faintly sinking feeling I get when I'm about to go in to a portrait exhibition - 17th April
  • A Modernist hits Baroque bottom - Of all the museums in London I think the Victoria and Albert is the one where I have most often felt a spasm of political rage. On the face of it this might seem a little odd - 10th April
  • A statue to Jade isn't a bad idea - The Daily Mirror reported the other day that Jade Goody may be honoured with a statue in Bermondsey. Pleasingly this was picked up and reported in an Indian online paper as "Jade Goody to be venerated with a statue near her childhood home", conjuring up an image of marigold-garlanded pilgrims coming to light candles before the shrine of the first martyr of reality television - 3rd April
  • Would Michelangelo get the nod? - Listening to a radio report recently about cultural commissions for the 2012 Olympics – replete with the usual careful hat-tips to regionality and public opinion and jury-led awards – I found myself idly wondering what would have happened if the same principles of accountability and representation had applied during the Renaissance - 27th March
  • For good drama turn off the TV - I saw a terrific television play – the only minor catch being that it wasn't on telly at all, but in the basement of a Shepherd's Bush shopping centre - 20th March
  • Even architects need their sheds - The Cabanon was Corbusier's holiday shack, designed – according to his own account – in just 45 minutes and built as a kind of lean-to next to his favourite restaurant in the south of France - 13th March
  • Don't fret, Pablo, you're a genius - the National Gallery's new exhibition Picasso: Challenging the Past - 6th March 2009
  • Gloom, doom and happy endings - I don't think bookies are offering odds on whether the Tate Triennial will successfully introduce a new "ism" to art, but I'd be betting against it if they were - 13th February
  • Flawed beauty and perfect dross - Like a lot of people I felt for poor Sebastian Barry, whose £25,000 cheque for this year's Costa Prize came with an unexpected helping of humble pie - 6th February
  • In acting, size isn't everything - 30th January
  • Reality bites amid all the fakery - Let me make a public service announcement. The Wrestler is not about wrestling - 23rd January
  • The fine art of Grand Theft Auto - If video games are to become an art, it won't be novels or films that provide the template – it may well be the gallery installation - 16th January
  • The dance of Degas's pygmalion - Is it a doll or is it a sculpture? Sotheby's, I take it, is absolutely clear - 9th January

Articles: 2008

The Independent:

Column ended July 2011

Column name: Social Studies

Remit/Info: Current affairs, contemporary culture and life

Section:

Role: Columnist

Pen-name:

Email: t.sutcliffe@independent.co.uk

Website: http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/columnists/thomas-sutcliffe

Commissioning editor:

Day published: Tuesday

Regularity: Weekly

Column format: Lead and secondary item

Average length:

Articles: 2011

Articles: 2010

Articles: 2009

  • Turfing out your kids – an official guide - You wonder what the thinking was behind the publication date of Parent Motivators, a pamphlet from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills - 30th December
  • Review of the Year 2009: Culture - Shining lights in the post-crash gloom - 23rd December
  • It's fine to keep some things in the closet - It was a good weekend for the morality of openness and candour. First of all the fearsomely masculine Welsh rugby player Gareth Thomas revealed he was gay - 22nd December
  • The funniest shows leave out laughter - 15th December
  • No dignity in this pretence of unity - These proposals are the sexual equivalent of the Nuremberg Laws - 1st December
  • Should we pay double to save the bookshop? - A civilized city without bookshops – or without enough bookshops – struck me as a contradiction in terms - 24th November
  • Belle de Jour's over-complicated life - If it was so enjoyable and so well paid, why did she stop back in 2004? - 17th November
  • A massacre that may or may not be art - What a fuss over the release of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 - 11th November
  • Let's be clear about what we're eating - It hasn't really been a good few days for this Government, when it comes to the relationship between simple scientific facts and public health - 3rd November
  • It's time to admit flying is a luxury - Forgive me Gaia for I have sinned – or rather I'm about to - 20th October
  • No fair trials in the court of public opinion - I heard the phrase "the Court of Public Opinion" quite a few times yesterday morning – prompted by interviews and discussions anticipating the fact that MPs were all going to get a letter from Sir Thomas Legg and a lot of them weren't going to like it - 13th October
  • Ban an image and the more it is noticed - by the time I got to Tate Modern's new show "Pop Life" it had, in the dictionary definition of that word, been put in an appropriate form for publication, at least as far as the police were concerned - 6th October
  • Drugs busts do little to crack the problem - Is there anything more depressing than a showcase drugs bust? - 29th September
  • Please stop asking if my meal is OK - A scene from modern life: I'm in a burger bar, one of those chains that charge the gastronomically snobbish a modest premium so they can pretend that they're not actually eating in a fast-food restaurant - 22nd September
  • Working-class culture... that's so middle class - "It pains me that working-class culture is sneered at and ridiculed. Fifty years ago it was seen as noble and dignified." This is Jon Cruddas, in yesterday's paper, answering a reader's question as to whether he thinks of himself as a class warrior - 15th September
  • A dead honest approach to passing away - Jonathan Holmes' play Katrina – at the Bargehouse near Oxo Tower Wharf on London's South Bank – ends with a funeral ceremony, a New Orleans send-off for Virgil, whose dead body has been floated across the flooded city by his devoted partner Beatrice - 8th September
  • Art that hits all the right notes - I think the best thing I've seen recently was a label. It read "Please Play" and it was painted in yellow letters on the scuffed concrete of the Roundhouse in London - 14th August
  • Charles Moore has got it wrong - Can you condemn an institution and simultaneously work for it? - 11th August
  • This is not the end of the matter - You suggested some fine examples of resonant last lines in novels. So much so, in fact, that I began to doubt the general truth I'd proposed, which was that they are inherently less memorable than openings - 7th August
  • What a waste of police time – and mine - I became a victim of crime last week. Twice. And in virtually identical circumstances. I don't know whether it's anything to do with the end of the school term, but we've suffered a rash of car break-ins in our particular patch of north London recently - 4th August
  • What a waste of police time – and mine - What was odd was how apologetic and tentative the police were - 4th August
  • A poor use of space on issues of astronomy - We've all grown used to the spiralling inflation of the press release but even so I was a little startled when I encountered in concrete fact a new exhibition at the Science Museum which the institution's press release had described on paper as "major" - 28th July
  • Honesty is in large part a social virtue - I don't have very high hopes for the Honesty Lab, an online research project set up by a group of academics in order to assist judges to gauge shifting public attitudes as to what counts as culpable (or punishable) dishonesty - 21st July
  • I entered a rat maze – and I was scared - I 'm going to do something irritating, which is to recommend an experience that you can't have - 14th July
  • We are owned by the things that we own - How many of us, I wonder, felt a twinge of envy when reading that the artist Jasper Joffe plans to sell absolutely everything he possesses and start again from scratch? - 7th July
  • Don't tell me the Queen's a bargain - You can see what Sir Alan Reid, the Keeper of the Privy Purse, had in mind when he broke down the annual cost of the monarchy to a per capita basis in presenting the Royal Family's accounts to us yesterday. Only 69p a year for all that history, we were supposed to think - 30th June
  • Without a plot there can be no revolution - It's a mildly startling fact that the first moonwalk is now less distant from the Wall Street Crash than it is from the present day - 23rd June
  • An unwelcome third party in literary fantasy - As a way of attracting attention to a retumescent organ, Kate Copstick's suggestion that women don't write as well about sex as men was pretty effective - 16th June
  • Our uneasy conscience as we watch Ms Boyle - It is hardly news, after all, that television programmes like Britain's Got Talent and Pop Idol are ready to utilise the mentally fragile for reasons of public entertainment - 2nd June
  • If you were an MP, would you do differently? - A phrase we've been hearing a lot of over the last few days is, "If it was us". Indignant constituents have been using it when reporters ask them to comment on the expense claims of their MPs: "If it was us we would be in court", they point out, or "If it was us we'd be in prison" - 19th May
  • Innocentish' - an essential part of justice - There was an interesting exchange on the Today programme the other day when Vernon Coaker, the minister for policing, crime and security, found himself defending the Government's baby-steps response to the European court's ruling on the legality of the DNA database - 12th May
  • Still not scared after my brush with swine flu - I sneezed yesterday – not an event that I would generally feel worthy of recording in print, but which was attended on this occasion by a mild curiosity - 5th May
  • Hope over experience in theatre of war - Addressing the annual dinner of the Royal Asiatic Society in 1908 Lord Curzon predicted that if the society still existed in "50 or a 100 years, Afghanistan will be as vital and as important a question as it is now" - 28th April
  • Last Night's Television: The Apprentice and The Speaker - (review) - 23rd April
  • How Madonna put Edward VII in the shade - It's intriguing, I think, that an exhibition of early colour photographs of Edwardian grandees should get newspaper exposure hard on the heels of a widely disseminated sepia photograph of a contemporary VIP - 21st April
  • Why respect what you have paid for? - Deference has had it pretty rough for the last 100 years – and even rougher in the last 20. A quality that was already finding it difficult to make a case for itself in an age of universal suffrage and egalitarianism found itself undermined even further by the notion that we should instinctively think of ourselves as customers rather than citizens - 7th April
  • It's time we redefined the word 'adult' - Odd phrase "adult movies" – and one that's only been with us, according to the OED, since 1958, where the first citation comes from a New Musical Express small ad offering "unusual adult photo sets" - 31st March
  • Why we are all haunted by religion - What a striking choice of words the Archbishop of Canterbury made when he said, on Sunday, that he believed we were "living in a country that is uncomfortably haunted by the memory of religion" - 24th March
  • We expect the worst of our Secret Service - I don't suppose many people will be shocked by the increasing evidence that there was British collusion in the torture of British detainees. Or more precisely – since the word "shocked" packs together a sense of moral outrage with the sense of being startled – not many people will have been surprised - 17th March
  • Some carefully chosen words from Adams - It was "wrong and counter-productive", declared Gerry Adams when asked to comment on the murders of two soldiers at the Massereene Army base, nothing about that form of words was uncalculated – and the Sinn Fein president will have crafted his response as carefully as a poet - 10th March
  • A lesson in drinking from the Scots - Not for the first time when it comes to a public health initiative the executive north of the border has left that in the south looking politically timid - 3rd March
  • Secrecy on pay can keep salaries down - Here’s a simple question: is the public disclosure of top salaries more likely to drive prices up or down? - 24th February
  • Confused? You will be in this drugs debate... - Professor David Nutt, head of the Advisory Council on Drugs Misuse, got himself into trouble over the weekend for suggesting that there was "not much difference between horse-riding and ecstasy" when it came to an assessment of potential social harm - 10th February
  • Manna from heaven for us 'selfish' adults - An unexpected snowfall (and is there any other kind in Britain, however accurate the forecast has been?) is better than a public holiday. It's a furlough from routine that comes without the downsides of Christmas or Easter - 3rd February
  • Will time ease the pain of the Holocaust? - it seems inevitable that our emotional connection will eventually undergo an evolution. And by "we" I don't mean you and me, but those generations that follow us - 27th January
  • It's not that easy to talk when your lips are blue and barely moving - "Well – it's not often that we can say that we are witnesses to the making of history," said Huw Edwards, introducing BBC 1's live coverage of the inauguration speech - 21st January
  • What to do with the ashes of a loved one? - My father's ashes sit on the sideboard with some bottles of single malt - 20th January
  • Save a branch of Woolworths for posterity - I popped in to one of my local Woolworths last week, visiting not as a customer but as a kind of deathbed hoverer - 13th January
  • You can't judge the past by today's standards - there's little doubt that if Oscar Wilde was a contemporary playwright his predilection for teenage boys would effectively guarantee the end of his career - 6th January

Articles: 2008

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