Sam Fleming

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Networks: https://twitter.com/Sam1Fleming | http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/sam-fleming/20/501/197

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About: Financial Times; Financial Policy Correspondent. Formerly Economics Editor of The Times. He originally qualified as a lawyer in the City of London in the late 1990s, before joining Bloomberg News, where he covered company news, stock markets and economics. He moved to The Daily Mail in 2006 to become Economics Correspondent and latterly Associate City Editor. He joined The Times in 2010, leaving in October 2013 to join the Financial Times.[1]

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Current position/role: Financial Times; Financial Policy Correspondent; The Times' (former) Economics editor

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Column name: Sam Fleming’s Economic Insight

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Articles: 2013

  • The real freeze is in Miliband’s mind - Ed Miliband’s gambit of bashing the utilities, announced at Labour’s party conference this week, was in keeping with tradition - 28th September
  • Carney must act to spoil the party - When George Osborne announced a new bubble-prevention squad within the Bank of England in 2010, he can scarcely have imagined that only three years later there would be calls for it to rush into action - 14th September
  • Without equality, recovery is fragile - McDonald’s outlets have not been seen traditionally as hotbeds of labour militancy, but thousands of fast-food workers have been striking all over the United States - 7th September
  • Hubris blocks path to Turkish delight - It seems unlikely that a crashing currency will puncture the swollen self-belief of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the increasingly authoritarian Prime Minister of Turkey - 26th August
  • Beware, we’ve seen this bubble before - Britain’s history is thickly littered with housing booms and busts - 17th August
  • Carney’s guidance proves confusing - George Osborne must be delighted with the central banker he so assiduously courted last year - 10th August
  • Hold on. Is the sun coming out in euroland? - Thanks to Mario Draghi and some tough sacrifices Europe may be pulling out of its worst crisis since the war - 8th August
  • An empty promise as tax pool shrinks - It was a foolhardy pledge, particularly coming from a Chancellor who is normally an astute tactician - 5th August
  • An empty promise as tax pool shrinks - It was a foolhardy pledge, particularly coming from a Chancellor who is normally an astute tactician - 3rd August
  • Time for fresh look across the Channel - Lord King of Lothbury tended to assume a somewhat lofty and pitying air when discussing Europe and its woes - 27th July
  • Ghosts of past still haunting Labour - Ed Miliband’s decision to back a review by the reforming peer Lord Adonis into ways to kick-start the economy is badly overdue - 13th July
  • This is a time for plain speaking - Central bankers used to revel in their own inscrutability, as epitomised by the jargon-strewn utterances of Alan Greenspan, the former US Federal Reserve chairman. Not anymore - 8th July
  • This is a time for plain speaking - Central bankers used to revel in their own inscrutability, as epitomised by the jargon-strewn utterances of Alan Greenspan, the former US Federal Reserve chairman - 6th July 2013
  • The Brics came tumbling down - After three years of not-so-special returns in the People’s Republic, Anthony Bolton, Fidelity’s star fund manager, has found that emerging markets are not the happy hunting ground that Western investors expected. He will stand down next year after a rocky spell running money out of Hong Kong - 22nd June
  • The fear of going back to the future - Sir Mervyn King, the Bank of England Governor, described the process of reversing quantitative easing as “completely straightforward” back in 2009. Instead, it is proving to be a nightmare - 15th June
  • Sterling should be allowed to stabilise - Will Mark Carney inherit a “crisis economy”, to use the damning description he deployed about Britain in April? The Canadian banker’s brutal verdict is looking increasingly at odds with the economic data - 8th June
  • Japan must tap into its people power - Fans of the monetary shock therapy prescribed by Haruhiko Kuroda are getting nervous - 1st June
  • Silver linings show through in the US - Wall Street swung from euphoria to neuralgia this week after Ben Bernanke made the obvious point that money printing is not for ever. But the market spasms that followed the Federal Reserve Chairman’s testimony should not obscure the big picture in the US - 25th May
  • Carney becomes an easy target - Fêted as a superhero among central bankers, Mark Carney will arrive at the Bank of England this summer amid impossibly high expectations - 18th May
  • Two parties both riven by the same old splits - The Tories are being sucked into the whirlpool of Europe, but Labour’s division on the economy runs just as deep - 14th May
  • Odd time for IMF to make a U-turn - Biblical U-turns are said to happen in the outskirts of Damascus; in economics they often happen in Washington - 11th May
  • Bear trap awaits the big spenders - Among the legacies of Japan’s infrastructure spending boom in the 1990s were the legendary roads for the bears — empty highways through remote forests on the island of Hokkaido that proved to be more popular with furry travellers than motorists - 4th May
  • America gets its priorities right - Even the notoriously circumspect International Monetary Fund is buying into the idea of an American recovery - 22nd April
  • Open the door to investment - George Osborne launched his economic strategy in 2010 on the assumption that, once he had hacked away Britain’s public sector thicket, business investment would leap, springbok-like, from the debris - 8th April
  • Osborne pins election hopes on another property bubble - Economic View: In a declaration reminiscent of the words of the Everest explorer George Mallory, Mark Carney said last year that he was coming to Britain because it is “where the challenges are greatest” - 25th March
  • The missed opportunity - Economic view: Against the odds, America is recovering. The country’s lawmakers have done their best to short-circuit the rebound with budgetary brinkmanship and a hideously ill-designed deficit reduction plan called the sequester - 11th March
  • Investors’ faith is waning - Lord Lawson of Blaby once observed that occasional sterling crises were an inescapable part of a Chancellor’s lot. “He soon learns, if not to enjoy them, at least not to lose any sleep over them,” the former Tory Chancellor said in his memoirs - 26th February
  • Over to you, Mr Carney - George Osborne’s advisers were delighted with Mark Carney’s Commons debut — and with good reason - 11th February
  • Who would be in our club? - The timing could scarcely have been worse. On Thursday, the Prime Minister addressed dignitaries in the Swiss ski resort of Davos and urged his European Union counterparts to embrace a more dynamic, flexible, free-trading business model - 28th January

Articles: 2012

  • Inflation can’t be ignored - Economic view: British history is littered with bungled economic policy experiments. We are now about to embark on an anguished period of debate after the biggest central banking debacle since the 1930s - 17th December
  • Uncle Sam’s comeback - Economic view: Could 2013 be the year in which America asserts itself as a re-emerging power? - 3rd December
  • Sir Mervyn King consults textbook as Britain loses advantage - As he enters the final half-year of his marathon stint at the helm of the BoE, Sir Mervyn King’s thoughts have been turning to his legacy. Last week’s downbeat Inflation Report suggested that the economy he leaves behind in June 2013 will be in a very sorry state indeed - 19th November
  • Bank seeks a solution - Economic view: On Thursday a landmark policy meeting will be held at Threadneedle Street. Having printed the equivalent of a quarter of Britain’s annual GDP and pumped it into the markets, the Bank of England appears ready to shelve quantitative easing - 5th November
  • Wake up to the noxious mood in the East - China’s aggression towards Japan threatens the West too. Beijing can’t sit at the top table unless it plays by the rules - 25th October
  • Recipe for French toast? - Economic view: Last May François Hollande marched into the French presidency pledging to roll back harsh Germanic prescriptions of austerity. Now that he’s in power, the mild-mannered Socialist is showing an unexpectedly ruthless streak - 8th October
  • Bridge isn’t ready yet - How can Britain capture a fatter slice of China’s economic miracle? - 24th September
  • We must innovate or die - After the Great Recession comes the Great Stagnation - 11th September
  • A failure of leadership - Last month Christine Lagarde was asked whether she could envisage the mother of all bailouts — the rescue of the United States. The Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund replied tersely that such an event was inconceivable because the IMF would never have sufficient resources for such a task - 13th August
  • Powerless to relieve these growing pains - It is a saga that “goes on and on and on”. Sir Mervyn King was speaking about the crisis in euroland, but the description could equally be applied to Britain’s dismal economic performance - 9th August
  • Caught in a fiscal ditch - Finance ministers should be wary of yoking their political fortunes to the fickle judgments of credit ratings agencies - 30th July
  • Waiting for a recovery - Sterling’s spectacular nosedive during the banking crash was Britain’s biggest currency devaluation since the exit from the Gold Standard in the early Thirties - 9th July
  • A policy with a Twist - Wall Street is used to getting what it wants from the Federal Reserve, so last week’s policy decision came as a shock - 25th June
  • Have politicians left it too late to save the euro? - Hank Paulson, the former US Treasury Secretary, got down on bended knee to plead with congressional leaders to prop up America’s banking system in 2008 - 4th June

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